EU battery replacement regulation

Cmaier

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How will they be shittier?

They will be thicker, heavier, and more fragile, and probably have less battery life. Wireless charging may also no longer be possible.
 

Cmaier

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Have faith, little soldier!
As an engineer, I have to put science ahead of magical thinking.

The most hopeful result is that the EU will back off, or interpret its regulations in such a way that as long as you only need a screwdriver to get at the battery, it’s fine. (i.e.: battery can’t be glued down).

By the way, another side-effect is water resistance goes out the window if you have removable batteries.
 

Joelist

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As an engineer, I have to put science ahead of magical thinking.

The most hopeful result is that the EU will back off, or interpret its regulations in such a way that as long as you only need a screwdriver to get at the battery, it’s fine. (i.e.: battery can’t be glued down).
I'm reading the regulation now, and it seems rather ambiguous.
 
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Joelist

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That was fun (God I hate reading EU regulations - they seem written in the worst officious mumbo jumbo)...
I can see where Mashable and a couple of other sites are getting their "right to repair" jollies from. But right in the same regulation it talks about how "appliances" are not all necessarily subject to removability and lists as cases for exemption if the product cannot be redesigned to allow removal without compromising its functionality and other such bollocks. Since all smartphone makers use sealed batteries and also all are using wireless charging, expect to read in the future about smartphones being exempted - exemption basically means the battery can be changed but you need an independent professional to do it - basically what is the case now.
 

Cmaier

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That was fun (God I hate reading EU regulations - they seem written in the worst officious mumbo jumbo)...
I can see where Mashable and a couple of other sites are getting their "right to repair" jollies from. But right in the same regulation it talks about how "appliances" are not all necessarily subject to removability and lists as cases for exemption if the product cannot be redesigned to allow removal without compromising its functionality and other such bollocks. Since all smartphone makers use sealed batteries and also all are using wireless charging, expect to read in the future about smartphones being exempted - exemption basically means the battery can be changed but you need an independent professional to do it - basically what is the case now.
Such vague regulations are the worst.
 

leman

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I am deeply disappointed by this aspect of the regulation. The worst thing is that the desired effect could have been achieved by mandating a price ceiling on battery replacement or even making them free of charge if say, a battery falls below 80% in 5 years.
 

Cmaier

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I am deeply disappointed by this aspect of the regulation. The worst thing is that the desired effect could have been achieved by mandating a price ceiling on battery replacement or even making them free of charge if say, a battery falls below 80% in 5 years.
Either of those make more sense.
 

Citysnaps

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I'm a little steamed they didn't mandate NiMH AA cells. A 4-pack is only 18 bucks at Best Buy. :)

3702620_sd.jpg;maxHeight=400;maxWidth=600.jpeg
 

theorist9

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As an engineer, I have to put science ahead of magical thinking.

The most hopeful result is that the EU will back off, or interpret its regulations in such a way that as long as you only need a screwdriver to get at the battery, it’s fine. (i.e.: battery can’t be glued down).

By the way, another side-effect is water resistance goes out the window if you have removable batteries.
If they do enforce this, the number of phones that are replaced due to water ingress might be larger than the number that aren't because of user-replaceable batteries. Hopefully they only require it be replaceable by a service center (independent or otherwise).
 

Herdfan

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I know it won't happen because the market is just too large, but for once I would like to see someone like Apple say No!, we will just stop selling our phones here and let the pissed off consumers have at the regulators.
 
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