Restaurant charges fees for loud kids

Edd

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This is some funny shit. Not being there, it’s hard to tell who’s in the wrong.


But, as non-parents by choice, we’d like to see more adults-only places like restaurants, hotels (stayed in one recently), airlines (sounds like bliss).

Fun fact: New Hampshire has no establishments that are strictly bars (expect perhaps for American Legion type joints). The law requires a business that sells alcohol to also sell food, so it all becomes restaurants. And with that comes kids. So you can’t really go to a kid-free bar here. I miss legit bars.
 

fooferdoggie

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it looks like they would get carried away and could be nasty too. hard to know for sure.
 

Herdfan

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I hate loud kids in restaurants. When I was dating my wife, there were some issues with her mom because she didn't see anything wrong with her 5yo grandson getting up and running around the restaurant. It got to the point I would not agree to go out with him. It was embarrassing.

Our own daughter knew from a very young age if she acted up, she was being taken outside. She got one mark (if she started acting up, we put a pen mark on the back of her hand to remind her that she would be in trouble if she kept it up. A second mark indicated she would be punished at the house) and then she was taken out.

Of course, this backfired once. We were being seated at like an Outback and walked by a table with a kid standing on the seat just being obnoxious and out of the mouths of babes, she said "He isn't behaving very well". No question the parents heard it. The initial embarrassment was soon replaced with pride. :)

So if I am ever in N Georgia, I will make sure to stop in just because. And will tell my daughter since she will be in Blue Ridge over Thanksgiving. Maybe she can go for me.
 

fischersd

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See, I think AI could help us with this problem. When people have children, they're locked in with shock collars. Their AI nanny monitors their behaviour. Bad parenting, they get a not-so-subtle reminder of what their appropriate action would be. :D

(shock collars are only removed after the children are moved out of the house....permanently) :D
 

Roller

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When our kids were young, my wife and I tried hard not to let them disturb people in restaurants and other venues, even if it meant taking them out for awhile. The only exception was on airplanes, where it was difficult to prevent them from crying because their ears hurt from the pressure changes. We did our best, but it's not as if there was anywhere else to go. The experiences made us much more understanding of what other parents were going through with their children.
 

Alli

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I’m much more understanding of children than adults. And I hate loud venues. Wherever the noise comes from, be it drunken young folk 8 tables away, old people at my table who shout because half of them either left their hearing aids at home or forgot to change/charge the battery (looking at my husband here), or venues that think conversation should be in healthy competition with background music.
 

Nycturne

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venues that think conversation should be in healthy competition with background music.

This right here is why I only went to a Mercurys Coffee once. I had trouble just communicating my food order to the employee there over the music. I can’t imagine having to work at a place like that full time.
 

Roller

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What do y'all thing about cell phone conversations? It's generally frowned upon in restaurants, on airplanes, and similar public places, even if the person is speaking at the same volume they'd use if they were taking to someone next to them. I suspect it has something to do with hearing only one side of the conversation, which somehow feels different.
 

Edd

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What do y'all thing about cell phone conversations? It's generally frowned upon in restaurants, on airplanes, and similar public places, even if the person is speaking at the same volume they'd use if they were taking to someone next to them. I suspect it has something to do with hearing only one side of the conversation, which somehow feels different.
Huge pet peeve of mine, I wish restaurants would crack down on that with signs, at least. Worse is when they watch videos with audio on.

I was at an airport last month at the gate. It was unusually quiet even though there were about 45 people in a relatively small area. We were all treated to a 35+ minute conversation a woman had on her phone and at no point did she apparently think to remove herself from the crowd. That’s wildly rude behavior in my book.
 

Yoused

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What do y'all thing about cell phone conversations?
I had a bit of an incident a number of years ago. Several preceding events had put me in a sour mood. I was standing in front of a bank of screens trying to locate my connecting flight, so I could get to the gate (it was not listed there). Then I heard "Hi, how's it going?" right behind me, less than a foot away from my ear. I turned around: "Get away from me with that fucking phone." He was not pleased with having his precious conversation interrupted with profanity and tried to chase me with threats of violence.

These days, with phones everywhere, I think people have slightly more awareness of personal space than that. But, it is still not fun having to hear half a conversation.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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venues that think conversation should be in healthy competition with background music.

I think the rule is the music volume gets decided by the drunkest person in the building.

Sometimes it’s not so much the volume as the genre. Not once have I been at a dance music festival and gone “You know what would be perfect right now? Filet mignon and honey glazed asparagus spears.” Now work that out in reverse.

There’s something I find slightly more annoying than moderately loud music. Going there with somebody you know is going to be annoyed about it and let you know. Like maybe you didn’t know in advance, but 10 seconds after you are seated predictable diatribe in 3…2…
 

Alli

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We went out to dinner tonight. I was the youngest with the best hearing. Husband and best friend, both 70 (rapidly approaching 71), partner of best friend, 81, mother, 89. The place was LOUD. There were two huge tables with parties of at least a dozen, and kids running all over. Then there fans to keep the humidity at bay. And music. The waiter had to repeat everything at least 3 times. He didn’t even understand that we couldn’t hear him over the din. SMH
 

Altaic

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Fun fact: New Hampshire has no establishments that are strictly bars (expect perhaps for American Legion type joints). The law requires a business that sells alcohol to also sell food, so it all becomes restaurants. And with that comes kids. So you can’t really go to a kid-free bar here. I miss legit bars.
I just told my girlfriend your factoid and she immediately said, “What about strip clubs? Does New Hampshire not have strip clubs?!” Gotta love her.

Also, there’s an obvious solution for bad parenting in restaurants: a modest proposal.
 
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Yoused

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Fun fact: New Hampshire has no establishments that are strictly bars (expect perhaps for American Legion type joints). The law requires a business that sells alcohol to also sell food …

We have a law like that in my state. I think it says that for you to sell distilled-spirit-based beverages (shots and umbrella drinks), a certain percentage of your revenue (significantly more than half) must be food sales. Which, I guess, is one way to insure that bar food carries airport prices.

We still have taverns, which sell beer and wine but no hard stuff and do not have the same food sales requirement. And, unlike some other states I have been in, your child cannot come into a bar or tavern (in at least one state, I saw a man buying his teenage son a beer).
 

fooferdoggie

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found a pic of the person complaint. seems the place covers their butt

Screenshot-2023-10-26-163429.jpeg
 
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