The Talked About Recipe Thread and Fun in the Kitchen

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fooferdoggie

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the closest to a thanksgiving meal I make. veggie fried rice with ham.
I use any veggies I want but this time it was graded cauliflower and carrots. I stir fry garlic and ginger then put I the veggies with some green onion and steam/fry them. add chopped ham then move to the outside and cook some eggs with sesame oil. then mix it all add some teriyaki sauce grain free oyster sauce and soy sauce.
IMG_1082.jpeg
 

Huntn

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Delicious Pecan Pie
Featured in Texas Monthly Magazine


88D50E2D-AB37-4AF9-BB88-A1D290096D9C.jpeg


Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 Cups granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 Cups light corn syrup
  • 3 TBS butter
  • 1 TSP vanilla extract
  • 4 large eggs, lightly beaten- beat them with fork or wire whisk until yokes and whites are well blended.
  • 1 Cup chopped pecans- some people like a combination of chopped and pecan halves. The difference is esthetic only.
  • 1- 9” unbaked pie shell
Instructions
  • In medium saucepan, combine sugar, corn syrup, butter, and vanilla extract.
  • Constantly stirring, bring to a boil over medium heat, then reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 6 minutes, continuing to stir. Note: Instead of just mixing these ingredients and stopping there, heating them on the stove top, dissolves the granulated sugar Into a creamy smooth consistency.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature, then mix in lightly beaten eggs, until well blended.
  • Preheat oven to 350F.
  • Place pecans evenly in the bottom of the pie shell, then pour sugar mixture over them.
  • Cook 50-60 minutes until pie is set in center. Note: Be wary of over cooking pie. At 60 minutes, my pie was not set in the center, I let it cook another 10 min, removed it and it firmed up as it cooled but was still slightly runny when cut into. Firmer is better.
 

fooferdoggie

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Delicious Pecan Pie
Featured in Texas Monthly Magazine




Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 Cups granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 Cups light corn syrup
  • 3 TBS butter
  • 1 TSP vanilla extract
  • 4 large eggs, lightly beaten- beat them with fork or wire whisk until yokes and whites are well blended.
  • 1 Cup chopped pecans- some people like a combination of chopped and pecan halves. The difference is esthetic only.
  • 1- 9” unbaked pie shell
Instructions
  • In medium saucepan, combine sugar, corn syrup, butter, and vanilla extract.
  • Constantly stirring, bring to a boil over medium heat, then reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 6 minutes, continuing to stir. Note: Instead of just mixing these ingredients and stopping there, heating them on the stove top, dissolves the granulated sugar Into a creamy smooth consistency.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature, then mix in lightly beaten eggs, until well blended.
  • Preheat oven to 350F.
  • Place pecans evenly in the bottom of the pie shell, then pour sugar mixture over them.
  • Cook 50-60 minutes until pie is set in center. Note: Be wary of over cooking pie. At 60 minutes, my pie was not set in the center, I let it cook another 10 min, removed it and it firmed up as it cooled but was still slightly runny when cut into. Firmer is better.
Should not add vanilla so soon wait till it is done cooking otherwise there wont be anything left.
 

fischersd

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We made these last night:


Phenomenal Honey-Garlic wing sauce (I'll likely increase the chill flakes next time to give them some zip) :)

Didn't bother brushing with oil - dusted the wings in flour, salt & pepper and cooked in the air fryer for 20 minutes at 390. Perfect!

I should have taken a pic. Gloriously sticky!!! :D
 

Scepticalscribe

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Reading recipes for Pasta All'Amatriciana.

It would appear that I have all of the necessary ingredients to hand.
And yes, it does appear that I have all of the necessary ingredients to hand.

Pasta All'Amatriciana:

This is a deceptively easy recipe, is very tasty, and is one that uses very few ingredients, but, like all such recipes, it stands or falls on the quality of the ingredients used.

The first step is to prepare the guanciale, the pig's cheek.

Cut off the rind and the peppered side, and discard (although the rind can be retained and used to flavour stock, or soups).

Slice it, and then dice it, and put it into a large pan (I used a large copper sauté pan) where a small quantity of olive oil has been heating. The diced guanciale will become translucent and transparent, the fat will render (and will give a glorious flavour to the sauce) and blend with the olive oil.

When the diced guanciale has rendered - and you can stir it with a wooden spoon - the meat soft, the fat luscious and succulent, add a small glass of white wine to the pan, and stir, allowing the alcohol to burn off.

Meanwhile, prepare the tomatoes: These will come from a tin - San Marzano (an excellent Italian brand, for preference); Open the tin, and tip the contents into a bowl or dish, where you mash them and cut them up; season them (with sea salt, - some recipes insist that this is not necessary as the guanciale is already quite salty - but I am of the opinion that tomatoes, in common with potatoes and eggs, that tomatoes also require the addition of some salt - freshly ground black pepper, and a dash of sugar, I used organic brown sugar); this is then added to the sauté pan, where the chopped and sautéed guanciale awaits; let this cook, at a simmer, stir occasionally, for around twenty minutes.

While the sauce is simmering, prepare a green salad if you wish: Today, I used mixed leaves (organic), and prepared a dressing: Olive oil, red wine vinegar, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, locally sourced organic runny honey (instead of sugar), French mustard.

I also grated some Pecorino Romano, to be served with the finished dish.

Water (rather than stock, the sauce will be sufficiently flavoursome, the pasta does not need the addition of being cooked in stock to enhance its flavour) is put to boil, with a little salt and olive oil added, and the pasta is then added once it has reached the boil. When almost ready, the pasta is drained, and added to the sauté pan, and a little of the pasta cooking water is retained, should a little more liquid need to be added to the sauce.

And this is when dinner is served.
 
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fooferdoggie

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And yes, it does appear that I have all of the necessary ingredients to hand.

Pasta All'Amatriciana:

This is a deceptively easy recipe, is very tasty, and is one that uses very few ingredients, but, like all such recipes, it stands or falls on the quality of the ingredients used.

The first step is to prepare the guanciale, the pig's cheek.

Cut off the rind and the peppered side, and discard (although the rind can be retained and used to flavour stock, or soups).

Slice it, and then dice it, and put it into a large pan (I used a large copper sauté pan) where a small quantity of olive oil has been heating. The diced guanciale will become translucent and transparent, the fat will render (and will give a glorious flavour to the sauce) and blend with the olive oil.

When the diced guanciale has rendered - and you can stir it with a wooden spoon - the meat soft, the fat luscious and succulent, add a small glass of white wine to the pan, and stir, allowing the alcohol to burn off.

Meanwhile, prepare the tomatoes: These will come from a tin - San Marzano (an excellent Italian brand, for preference); Open the tin, and tip the contents into a bowl or dish, where you mash them and cut them up; season them (with sea salt, - some recipes insist that this is not necessary as the guanciale is already quite salty - but I am of the opinion that tomatoes, that, in common with potatoes and eggs, tomatoes are a delight that requires the addition of some salt - freshly ground black pepper, and a dash of sugar, I used organic brown sugar); this is then added to the sauté pan, where the chopped and sautéed guanciale awaits; let this cook, at a simmer, stir occasionally, for around twenty minutes.

While the sauce is simmering, prepare a green salad if you wish: Today, I used mixed leaves (organic), and prepared a dressing: Olive oil, red wine vinegar, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, locally sourced organic runny honey (instead of sugar), French mustard.

I also grated some Pecorino Romano, to be served with the finished dish.

Water (rather than stock, the sauce will be sufficiently flavoursome, the pasta does not need the addition of being cooked in stock to enhance its flavour) is put to boil, with a little salt and olive oil added, and the pasta is then added once it has reached the boil. When almost ready, the pasta is drained, and added to the sauté pan, and a little of the pasta cooking water is retained, should a little more liquid need to be added to the sauce.

And this is when dinner is served.
the way you write about making the food is great.my days of enjoyable foods are over but I like to watch others cook and such
 

Scepticalscribe

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the way you write about making the food is great.my days of enjoyable foods are over but I like to watch others cook and such
Thank you.

When I read a recipe, while I enjoy (even revel in, and relish) an elegant prose style (both Nigel Slater, and Jay Rayner, for example, write beautifully about food), I also look for two further key elements or features:

The first is whether the recipe is "doable", whether it reads as though I could master it, or do it, fairly easily, or without undue stress.

There is a reason I do not post any recipes that involve baking: Baking is precise and exacting cooking, one that requires close concentration, and it is both quite demanding and fairly unforgiving; leaving aside the (relevant) fact that I do not have a sweet tooth, my palate prefers savoury stuff, (and besides, one is often quite full by the time dessert rolls around), that is not what I am after, when I set out my pots and pans.

So, I look to see whether a recipe looks as though when you read it, you think, "ah, yes, I can do that". And yes, better still, I will even enjoy doing that, preparing that dish, or meal. Relaxed, enjoyable, unstressed cooking.

How many recipes - or TV programmes - have you (or anyone) read or watched and thought - dismally - that's wonderful but is way beyond my pay-grade; or, that is wonderful, but there is no way I will be able to do that: or, that is wonderful, but - yelp! - it is waaay too complicated and difficult and demanding.....and.....and....

Cooking that makes you feel inadequate just by looking at it is no fun, lacks joy, and, to my mind, misses the point somewhat. You should want someone to want to do this, and not make them feel inadequate and incompetent and frustrated.

The second test I apply when reading a recipe is whether I think I will enjoy it, - the finished product - whether it reads as though it would be something that I think would be good to eat. Do I want to eat - better still, devour - that dish when I have finished reading the recipe? If the answer is in the affirmative, is a heartfelt yes, then, yes, I will want to try to cook it.

And so, when writing recipes, I try to do the same: Write something that people know, or realise, when reading it - that yes, I'm pretty certain that I can do this, and that also means writing clear and easy to follow instructions - and secondly, write something that you think (or hope) that people will want to eat when they have finished cooking it.
 

Huntn

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Date Pinwheels (via Mom/Aunt Dot)
Found this identical online recipe, but it includes the vanilla extract. It says this makes 16 dozen cooki…...but I ended up with about 4 dozen. :)
13Dec22-Recipe edited, see dough section. Added instructions to avoid complications.

Date Filling
  • 2 1/2 Cups Dates*
  • 1 Cup Sugar
  • 1 Cup Water (may need more)
  • 1 Cup Chopped Pecans
* In the olden days ;), I remember being able to find a box of chopped dates at the grocery store for baking. I’ve not made this in more than a decade. My visit to 2 local groceries, and they had whole dates, but none chopped and packaged. So I used whole dates, cut them up with scissors not fine enough to be called chopped and at the end of cooking used a masher to get the bigger remaining pieces to break down. I have yet to assemble these, and will report back with any issues with chunky date filling.

Dough
  • 1 Cup Shortening
  • 2 Cups Brown Sugar
  • 3 Eggs
  • 4 Cups Flour
  • 1/2 Tsp Salt
  • 1/2 Tsp Baking Soda
  • 1/2 Tsp Vanilla Extract (optional)
  • Wax Paper and/or plastic wrap
  • rolling pin
Instructions
Date Filling

  • In a large saucepan, bring the dates, sugar and water to a boil. Reduce heat to medium; cook until mixture is thickened, about 15 minutes. Cool completely. Stir in pecans.
Dough
  • In a large bowl, cream butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy.
  • Beat in eggs and vanilla. Combine the flour, salt and baking soda; gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well.
  • Divide into four portions, wrap in wax paper. Refrigerate until chilled.
  • On a baking sheet, roll out each portion of dough between two sheets of waxed paper into a 12x9-in. rectangle. It you try to do this without wax paper, you’ll need flour on the rolling pin and on the dough itself or it will end up sticking to the rolling pin. Wax paper is easier. Wax paper u der each and on top, roll out with a rolling pin. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  • Note: It’s important that for the first 30 Min timing that you want theses doughs fully cooled in the refrigerator. At this stage the dough is sticky and can become as mess real fast if you don’t follow the instructions. You can even wait 60 minutes. :)
  • Remove waxed paper off the top of the dough, pull gently parallel to the surface of the dough and it should separate mostly clean of dough. Lay it (the removed paper) flat and spread a light coating of flour on it. Then flip and lay the dough on wax paper with flour, exposed side down. Pull off the other piece of wax paper that is on top In the same manner. Spread the date mixture On top. Then tightly roll up each portion jelly-roll style, starting at the long side and wrap in wax paper. Refrigerate for 2 hours or until firm.
Assembly and cooking
  • Unwrap dough and cut into 1/4-in. slices.
  • Place 1 in. apart on greased baking sheets.
  • Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes or until set.
  • Remove to wire racks or where ever to cool.
Aftermath
  • Store in an airtight container at room temperature, or freeze for up to 3 months.
  • Also if you are a cookie dough fanatic, try these raw, at your own risk, lol… delicious! My mom used to keep one of the uncooked rolls in the freezer for me to snack on when I came home at Christmas to visit. :D
 

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Huntn

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Chicken Salad with a Flair!
35FC9321-8405-4E59-AEC1-700666E5F149.png
Chicken Salad with Fruit
1982 Southern Living Annual Recipes, page 171.
Yields 8-10 servings (not sure about that…but it is delicious and easy to make.)
Credited to: Mrs Kenneth Olson, Dunnellon, Florida

Ingredients
  • 4 Cups of Chopped or shredded boiled chicken (I prefer thighs, shred it with a fork)
  • 2 Cups of thinly sliced celery
  • 1-2 Tbs of minced onions (I use scallions)
  • 3/4 Cup of Mayonnaise
  • 1/4 Cup of Whipping Cream
  • 1 Tbs Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 Tsp salt
  • White. pepper to taste (a couple of shakes for me)
  • 1/4-1/2 Cup of Slivered Almonds, toasted. (I don’t toast them, jus buy them already sliced.)
  • 2-3 cups of Cantaloupe Balls (I just go with slices)
  • Seedless Green grapes (nice but opional imo)
  • Lettuce Leaves (optional)
Instructions
  • Combine Chicken and Celery in a bowl, mix up.
  • Combine next 6 ingredients in a separate bowl, stir well.
  • Add to chicken mixture and toss well.
  • Chill
  • Serve salad on Lettuce Leaves
  • Sprinkle with toasted almonds.
  • Garnish with melon balls and grapes.
  • Enjoy! :D
 
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Huntn

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Crusty Beef Casserole (Southern Living 1982 Annual Edition)

IMG_3124.jpeg

This is delicious and easy to make.
Notes:
  • This is good as is, but in a 12x8x2“ pan, you could double the meat (requiring an increase in other Ingredients-tomato sauce, chili powder, garlic) for a thicker casserole.
  • I go lighter on the chili power, say half, but I found the 2 Tbs called for in the recipe to be edible. To test your own boundaries, the first time making this, I go with 1 Tbs. Note, I used ground turkey so maybe for beef?

Ingredients
  • 1 Lb of Ground Beef (I prefer chicken or turkey).
  • 1/4 Cup Onion minced.
  • 1 clove Garlic minced (Can be doubled, personal preference.)
  • 2- 8oz cans Tomato Sauce.
  • 2 TBS- Chili Power (some go lighter on the chili powder).
  • 1 Cup shredded Cheddar Cheese.
  • 1- 16oz can Pinto Beans (undrained).
  • 1- 6oz package Cornbread Mix (get ingredients for cornbread mix, likely egg, milk).
Instructions
  • Cook ground beef, onion, garlic in skillet, until beef is brown crumbly. Drain pan drippings.
  • Mix in Tomato Sauce and Chili Powder.
  • Spoon meat mixture into lightly greased 12”x8”x2” pan.
  • Top with Cheese.
  • Spoon Beans over cheese.
  • Mix cornbread according to the package directions and spread on top.
  • Bake @400F for 25 min or until cornbread is golden
 
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Roller

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Chicken Salad with a Flair!
Chicken Salad with Fruit
1982 Southern Living Annual Recipes, page 171.
Yields 8-10 servings (not sure about that…but it is delicious and easy to make.)
Credited to: Mrs Kenneth Olson, Dunnellon, Florida

Ingredients
  • 4 Cups of Chopped or shredded boiled chicken (I prefer thighs, shred it with a fork)
  • 2 Cups of thinly sliced celery
  • 1-2 Tbs of minced onions (I use scallions)
  • 3/4 Cup of Mayonnaise
  • 1/4 Cup of Whipping Cream
  • 1 Tbs Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 Tsp salt
  • White. pepper to taste (a couple of shakes for me)
  • 1/4-1/2 Cup of Slivered Almonds, toasted. (I don’t toast them, jus buy them already sliced.)
  • 2-3 cups of Cantaloupe Balls (I just go with slices)
  • Seedless Green grapes (nice but opional imo)
  • Lettuce Leaves (optional)
Instructions
  • Combine Chicken and Celery in a bowl, mix up.
  • Combine next 6 ingredients in a separate bowl, stir well.
  • Add to chicken mixture and toss well.
  • Chill
  • Serve salad on Lettuce Leaves
  • Sprinkle with toasted almonds.
  • Garnish with melon balls and grapes.
  • Enjoy! :D
I love chicken salad, so thanks for posting!
 
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