New in iOS 17- grid warnings?

Cmaier

Site Master
Staff Member
Site Donor
Posts
5,666
Reaction score
9,312
1694566601679.png


I just found this in my Home app with the new release candidate. Never saw this before.
 

Altaic

Power User
Posts
199
Reaction score
249
Whoa! I wonder if it’s some kind of smart meter wireless thing, or if it’s querying your address at a central authority. Did you have to give it any info?
 

Cmaier

Site Master
Staff Member
Site Donor
Posts
5,666
Reaction score
9,312
Whoa! I wonder if it’s some kind of smart meter wireless thing, or if it’s querying your address at a central authority. Did you have to give it any info?
I gave it no info. Must be geolocating. It’s also probably not right in my case - I use a green electricity generation company. It probably assumes PG&E generates my electricity.
 

Altaic

Power User
Posts
199
Reaction score
249
I gave it no info. Must be geolocating. It’s also probably not right in my case - I use a green electricity generation company. It probably assumes PG&E generates my electricity.
Interesting. I was able to find a bit of info from Apple. Seems it uses the weather as well as other info, and they say, "As additional data becomes available through ongoing industry collaboration, Apple will continue refining Grid Forecast to maximize impact." So I guess they're scraping data from energy providers and using geolocation, rather than e.g. getting specific information directly from your meter.
 

rdrr

Elite Member
Posts
1,304
Reaction score
2,206
Dude! It’s on point for me - no clean energy. Ever. Welcome to Alabackwards.
Do you have family from Alabackwards, or another reason to stay there? ☺️

Maybe I missed your bio if you shared before, or it also could be my age and what that does for memory.
 

Alli

Perfection
Staff Member
Site Donor
Posts
6,013
Reaction score
12,023
Location
Alabackwards
Do you have family from Alabackwards, or another reason to stay there? ☺️

Maybe I missed your bio if you shared before, or it also could be my age and what that does for memory.
My husband’s family is all here, and I just moved my mother here.
 

phongn

New member
Posts
2
Reaction score
2
I gave it no info. Must be geolocating. It’s also probably not right in my case - I use a green electricity generation company. It probably assumes PG&E generates my electricity.

Isn't most of the region pretty much a unified grid for wholesale power? Even if you are paying PG&E, one of the CCAs or one of the municipal power companies for their "make dedicated 'green' energy contracts" plans at some point some energy is going to be generated and then transmitted on the wire by in-state natural gas peakers or out-of-state coal imports.
 

Cmaier

Site Master
Staff Member
Site Donor
Posts
5,666
Reaction score
9,312
Isn't most of the region pretty much a unified grid for wholesale power? Even if you are paying PG&E, one of the CCAs or one of the municipal power companies for their "make dedicated 'green' energy contracts" plans at some point some energy is going to be generated and then transmitted on the wire by in-state natural gas peakers or out-of-state coal imports.
Yeah, probably. I have no idea what the actual effect is of me buying the energy from a different company, in terms of the actual mix.
 

phongn

New member
Posts
2
Reaction score
2
Yeah, probably. I have no idea what the actual effect is of me buying the energy from a different company, in terms of the actual mix.

I think the big idea for opting into such mixes is that it guarantees a certain buy from renewable/green providers, which makes such projects more economically feasible. Hopefully the big utility-scale battery farms being built will provide enough energy storage to at least get past the evening 'duck curve' ramp and maybe even well into the night.

CAISO has a nice website (and mobile apps) that tell you the supply mix; at the time of this post about 32.8% of California active use is from natural gas.
 

Cmaier

Site Master
Staff Member
Site Donor
Posts
5,666
Reaction score
9,312
I think the big idea for opting into such mixes is that it guarantees a certain buy from renewable/green providers, which makes such projects more economically feasible. Hopefully the big utility-scale battery farms being built will provide enough energy storage to at least get past the evening 'duck curve' ramp and maybe even well into the night.

CAISO has a nice website (and mobile apps) that tell you the supply mix; at the time of this post about 32.8% of California active use is from natural gas.
Ah, cool, thanks for the link!

The nice thing is that the supplier I use is actually also cheaper than PG&E (by a little), so I get to feel snooty about helping the environment while also saving a little cash.
 
Top Bottom
1 2